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Free Pancakes at IHOP for National Pancake Day

IHOP at 850 W 1250 S, as seen from the parking lot.

February 27th is National Pancake Day at IHOP, and they’re continuing a favorite tradition: free pancakes!

The promotion runs from 7am to 7pm around the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, Guam, and Mexico. Each customer may order a stack of three buttermilk pancakes (normally $3.99), entirely for free. One per customer and dine-in only.

Although they aren’t required to pay, IHOP is encouraging customers to make a donation to one or more of their charity partners: Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and Shriners Hospitals for Children. Since 2006, IHOP customers have raised over $30 million on National Pancake Day, and IHOP’s goal for this year is $6 million. read more

Editorials History Politics and Polls

What Exactly Is Presidents’s’s Day?

On this coming Monday, car dealerships will run cringe-worthy TV ads, post offices will close, department stores will advertise blowout sales, and overworked high school students everywhere will get to sleep in. But why?

Depending on where you look, you’ll get a different answer. Many would say it’s thanks to Presidents Day, while others would refer to President’s Day or Presidents’ Day. A Google search will reveal significant debate; however, the truth is that each spelling holds its own connotative advantages and disadvantages. read more

Editorials History

Amateurs Unearth Unique Roman Mosaic in UK

Three weeks ago in Boxford, England, a group of 55 volunteer hobbyist archaeologists unearthed what has been described as “without question the most exciting mosaic discovery made in Britain in the last fifty years” (Beeson).

Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, amateurs working alongside several historians spent three summers to locate and excavate the remains of a large Roman villa, including this magnificent mosaic that dates to AD 380.

Roman villas of this timeframe usually consisted of several buildings: one for the owner and his family, another for the slaves, servants, and chef, and a third to store produce until it could be transported for sale. These buildings were arranged in a square or rectangle to create an isolated courtyard in the middle. read more

History Politics and Polls World News

How did North Korea Come into Existence?

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or North Korea, was created in 1948 after the end of World War II in 1945. Just as Japanese occupation ended, Soviet forces rushed into the northern region of Korea and installed Kim Il-sung as the North’s leader. In 1950, the Korean War broke out, it lasted 3 years and caused over 1.2 million deaths. North Korea was allied with China and the Soviet Union, but after the 1980’s, when the Soviet Union collapsed, and China changed their policies, North Korea was left all alone. In 1994, Kim Il-sung died and left North Korea in the hands of his son, Kim Jong-il. Kim Jong-il is known as the most secretive of the Kim family, and to this day not much is known about him. Even so, historians/political leaders do have a knowledge of his death in December of 2011, and passed on North Korea to his third oldest son, Kim Jong-un, who rules the North to this very day. read more

Featured History

Internment in the United States

At 7:55, a U.S. Navy Signal tower telephoned the Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet, “Enemy air raid, not a drill.” Right then, Japanese Torpedo planes commenced their attack. 21 planes ripped through the headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, sinking the U.S.S. Utah, among others. U.S. sailors heroically fought against the Japanese planes, getting their guns shooting in less than ten minutes. Despite this, the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor struck a devastating blow to the U.S. Navy. read more

Editorials Featured World News

End of China’s One Child Policy

Li Mei, now forty-five years old, sells balloons on the street corner of China’s capital city, Beijing. Here she migrated from her small, rural town in Hunan — over a 10 hour bus ride. When told China’s one child policy has finally been lifted, a wide smile graces her face. She relates a story about how in her small of Hunan town, she paid hundreds of dollars in fines to have her three children, leaving her future and that of her children burdened with debt. She says, “Everyone wants to have a second child, but the fines are a burden on us. But that’s the policy, and we can’t fight it.” read more