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Editorials Entertainment

The Review Series: Skyrim

The Review Series: Produced by Elleman and Joseph
“A new series produced by the UCAS Journalism team, producers Elleman and Joseph will be posting reviews on both concepts of media and art, whether they be new or old.”

Review- Elder Scrolls : Skyrim

Imagine you could travel to distant lands, or create weapons of mass destruction. Imagine fighting against Dragons with just your voice, or brewing the most powerful potions of all time. Well, you don’t need to, this is Skyrim. Released and developed by Bethesda Game Studios in 2011, Skyrim has won 13 awards and has been nominated for 16 others. The game has not only changed the RPG landscape for good, it’s redefined it. Without Skyrim, games like Dragon Age: Inquisition or Witcher III would be very different when it comes to gameplay.
With that said, it also revolutionized open world gaming engines and created a standard that other RPGs have attempted to recreate. Skyrim added a crazy amount of detail into the lore and interactivity of the game that created this expectation that has changed RPGs forever. Some of my favorites are: if you use a fire spell on water it boils; tamed mammoths have markings on their tusks; and if you know where to look you can find ants crawling on the ground; but nothing comes close to the entire language Bethesda created for their dragons. This is one of many reasons people love Skyrim, but why do people not like Skyrim?
Before Skyrim, RPG’s were similar to The Legend of Zelda in a way, with their story driven narrative, quests that ultimately helped develop the narrative, and simple but sometimes difficult puzzles. Skyrim changed all that. Though there was a main storyline, there were also 1000 other storylines. They also added side quests that didn’t add much to the story, such as “Help 3 citizens to become Thain” or “Kill 7 rabbits to get 70 gold”. One other thing is that the puzzles in Skyrim were either too easy or so hard you’d have to google the answer.
Though Skyrim is a brilliant game, the 70 voice actors, multiple glitches, and overused Architecture causes Skyrim to loss it’s God like stance. Don’t get me wrong Skyrim has brought me many hours of joy and tears from dying without saving on Legendary. Without Skyrim RPG’s today would be quite different and pushed open world engines to it’s max, but I’m tired of everyone praising Skyrim as if it’s the all knowing God of RPGs. Skyrim isn’t perfect, but it’s pretty darn close. read more

Editorials History

Amateurs Unearth Unique Roman Mosaic in UK

Three weeks ago in Boxford, England, a group of 55 volunteer hobbyist archaeologists unearthed what has been described as “without question the most exciting mosaic discovery made in Britain in the last fifty years” (Beeson).

Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, amateurs working alongside several historians spent three summers to locate and excavate the remains of a large Roman villa, including this magnificent mosaic that dates to AD 380.

Roman villas of this timeframe usually consisted of several buildings: one for the owner and his family, another for the slaves, servants, and chef, and a third to store produce until it could be transported for sale. These buildings were arranged in a square or rectangle to create an isolated courtyard in the middle. read more

Editorials Entertainment Featured

Unknown Media: Flipnotes

The Nintendo DS franchise: highly renowned as the portable gaming device for thousands of the world’s favorite game series, with Pokemon and Animal Crossing only two classic titles that Nintendo fans have grown to cherish and love. With so many popular game titles and franchises dominating the most part of the DS market, thousands of lesser-known games and programs have been lost along the way.

That said, such undiscovered titles are not unpopular due to the lack of quality or services that they are able to provide. Games such as Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow and Rhythm Heaven have proven to be fantastic games, with high ratings from both the community and professional reviewers alike. The developed marketplace has simply restricted such titles from becoming exponentially popular. read more

Editorials Featured

Standardized Testing

As the new school year has just begun, many of the students of UCAS students are very excited to get it started. Despite the aura of eagerness going around, there’s a small part of school life soon to haunt students and teachers alike: standardized testing. Standardized testing has become a staple of American education, as children take them from as soon as kindergarten, all the way up to college. Giving a child a test can very well measure: how fast they can take in the information, how attentive they are while the speaker is talking, and how well they understand the source material. If it seems like such a good idea from our current perspective, why give it any attention? Because to fully understand something, you have to take a look at it from every perspective. read more

Editorials Entertainment

Sundance Film Festival

Park City, Utah-

With the Sundance Film Festival beginning today, film geeks and hipster envisionaries are bundling up in their peacoats and film paraphernalia in high hopes to buy tickets to the country-renounced event.

Hosted at the Sundance Resorts, Park City, the Sundance Film Festival is one of the most popular film festivals to this day. Famous film directors and young, intuitive film producers across America are rising up to the occasion, directing and composing innovative and sublime reels of film JUST for Utah’s popular event. read more

Editorials Technology

iBoss is not a catalyst for education; it’s a wall

Being a senior at UCAS, I have experienced both times with and without iBoss enabled on our school network. In my sophomore year, internet throughout UCAS was filtered indiscriminately, and students were often complaining about how they couldn’t access youtube or other sites they frequently visited. Then, throughout my junior year, the firewall seemed to have dissipated entirely. Now, I have witnessed the disturbing resurgence of iBoss’s reign over the UCAS school network.

I can understand the purpose of an internet filter at schools. The filter is a fantastic safety net to protect students from shadier parts of the web and can sometimes steer them away from legal trouble. The firewall also is a wonderful tool to help students stay focused on school work by blocking games and other such content. These two purposes I agree with entirely, as I have witnessed the beneficial effects of both. On my PC at home, I’ve installed software to achieve a similar purpose, and I can set hours for the software to block certain websites so that I can finish school work. read more

Editorials Lifestyle

The Stress of School: Is it only the Beginning?

Over the course of the past five, the number of children that claim to have experienced great levels of stress at the beginning of the school year has just about doubled. Yet, here at UCAS, everybody appeared to enter through the front doors of UCAS with high hopes and contagious optimistic attitudes, leaving several of us scratching our heads. Are the students of UCAS also experiencing the same levels of stress as the students of other schools around the country? If so, will the stress levels increase as the school days go by? Do college courses and early testing days have anything to do with the pressure placed upon our parting porcelain patience? read more

Editorials Technology

Nuclear Energy, Yay or Nay?

There are many misconceptions about nuclear energy, and it’s understandable considering how the word “nuclear” is in the title, and many get spooked real quick. Even though anti-nuclear energy advocates, like Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein, say “nuclear energy is dirty, dangerous and expensive,” it’s proven to be the opposite. Unlike natural gas and coal, nuclear energy doesn’t give off any air pollution.

According to Jill Stein, “nuclear power would never survive on a free open market.” Really? Each nuclear energy plant creates more jobs than any other energy source individually: the Nuclear Energy Institute found that wind and gas create 50, coal creates 190, hydro creates anywhere from 100-450, solar creates 470, and nuclear energy creates 500. These numbers are approximate, but it shows that nuclear energy employs more people, making it better for the economy. Also, nuclear energy doesn’t give off any air pollution like natural gas or coal. Sorry, but that steam coming out of nuclear plants is just plain ol’ steam. Either way, I’m quite sure that Lindsey Graham lets off more steam than a nuclear energy plant. read more

Editorials Featured World News

End of China’s One Child Policy

Li Mei, now forty-five years old, sells balloons on the street corner of China’s capital city, Beijing. Here she migrated from her small, rural town in Hunan — over a 10 hour bus ride. When told China’s one child policy has finally been lifted, a wide smile graces her face. She relates a story about how in her small of Hunan town, she paid hundreds of dollars in fines to have her three children, leaving her future and that of her children burdened with debt. She says, “Everyone wants to have a second child, but the fines are a burden on us. But that’s the policy, and we can’t fight it.” read more