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Julie Arnold

UCAS news

Mrs.Turnwell?

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Mrs. Bramwell,our dearest Junior English teacher, has recently fallen into love with a college student by the name of Paul Turner. After several months of dating her newfound love, her boyfriend finally popped the question.

They met eleven months ago, through a mutual friend in Bountiful. The two got along nicely in the beginning, going on the occasional date from time to time. After several months of chatting, dancing, and getting to know each other, Paul suggested the idea of taking a small, deserved trip to Seattle.

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A vow of silence

A vow of silence. Sounds pretty serious, right? These kinds of vows are usually used in religion as a way to clear their mind, and develop a closer connection to their higher power. Lately, though, many people have been doing them to help clear their minds. I’ve been thinking about this a lot recently. Finally, I decided to try it.

I would go a whole 24 hours without saying anything. I could write out what I wanted when needs be. But overall I tried to talk as little as possible. I told my parents, and friends before hand or the day of, so they would understand why I wasn’t talking to them.

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UCAS news

Lighten the Load

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Crowds of people fill the hallway with each ring of the bell. Each is carrying a backpack, a bag that may be heavier than the recommended weight. Students at UCAS have many classes, and with each class they have a certain amount of required supplies. Notebooks, writing utensils, textbooks, and binder are the usual arsenal. But, is it necessary to have seven binders, a couple folders, and a couple packs of pencils?

Scientists say that students should be carrying backpacks that are roughly 10 to 15 percent of your body weight. “That means a 100-pound child should take no more than 10 pounds of books on their back (http://www.kidsgrowth.com/resources/articledetail.cfm?id=216).However, it seems to be a rule students are willing to bend, time and time again. Students walk these hallways with backpacks that keep getting larger and larger.. For example, Arianna Lone, a sophomore, says “it is hurting my back, it’s causing my spine to bend, causing my health to decrease”. The “it” she is talking about would be her 25-pound backpack, which is 22 percent of her body weight. It’s only seven percent more than what the doctors recommend, but it makes a huge difference.

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The Science of Executive Function

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Many students here at UCAS, and any other high school, know that it’s hard to get organized. Well, on February 2, 2016, the National Public Radio released in article about executive function, which is basically how are brain works to organize the things we learn, how we reason, and plan. In this article they explained that high school students have been getting help from tutors who specialize in executive function. The tutors would teach the students how to organize, and ways to remember the different concepts they are learning in school.

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Merchant of Venice

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Shakespeare has made many plays that entertain a wide range of audiences, from commoners in the street, to UCAS students, to the Queen of England. UCAS students have been given the opportunity to read two Shakespeare plays in this years English 10 class. This semester we are focusing on the Merchant of Venice. A play which covers the topics of justice, and mercy, by integrating them into a tale of deceit, love, and betrayal.

In place of a test, the UCAS sophomores have been doing projects to demonstrate their knowledge of this play. They were given the options of a movie, storybook, diorama, sportscaster, a song, or just about anything that would prove you studied the book and understood it. Along with the project you also had to do a report about the project you did, and question about how the scenes you presented were important to the rest of the play.

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Pros and Cons of Homework

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Much of UCAS’ curriculum is homework. It’s a big part of the student’s lives. Some are more willing to do it than others, but one way or another, they get it done. Does homework actually have benefits? Studies have shown that it does improve how much information you retain from class discussions, and it does help some students to do better on tests. It doesn’t help other students however, when it comes to test days. It could be debated that they didn’t really put any effort into their homework, or they tried really hard on their homework but still didn’t understand the concepts. Is it really the students fault?

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Driver’s Education

There are a few simple pleasures in life that a sixteen year old looks forward to; One being a drivers license.  UCAS’ drivers education class started on September 14, 2015, and there will be other sessions throughout the year.  Drivers Education is a class dedicated on teaching people ages fifteen and older, how to be safe while driving. It also prepares students to take the Road test, which will enable them to receive their drivers license from the Drivers Licences Division, (DLD) .

UCAS Drivers Ed has four main sections that will allow students to pass the road test. The first section is the class. That is where the students will come into the computer lab six at seven-thirty in the morning, to learn about risky behaviors, social pressures, and awareness of driving. Second is the simulations; simulations is when the Driver’s Ed teacher will project a film that is teaching students how to maneuver the streets. It will show them how to make left and right turns; pull off and on the streets; enter the freeway; switch lanes; survey their surroundings; and how to prevent crashes.

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Anxiety

Hands shaking, shallow breathing, and your mind is coming up with a million ways that this situation could go wrong. All are symptoms of anxiety, most people confuse this with stress, but they are two different things. Stress is how you react to a situation. Whereas anxiety is how you react to the stress. Anxiety is one of the most common health problem in children and young adults.

There are two types of anxieties, the more common ones that can happen to everyone and the more serious anxieties. Everyday anxieties are caused by stressing situations. For example, giving a big speech in school, tests, realistic fears (think spiders, claustrophobia, falling). Then there are anxiety disorders.  Those with an anxiety disorder feel like that everyday. Where little stresses that most often are overlooked, are the most pressing matters for them (being late). They are constantly worried about being humiliated, and avoid places with things that could potentially harm them in some way.

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Uniquely You

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UCAS is home to many different and unique students. Selin Caliskan -a tenth grader at UCAS, loves reading. She also likes play the piano, run, and much more. She likes to spend time with her cousins. Selin has been playing piano since she was eight years old, and has preformed in several recitals. Like many others, Selin chose to go to UCAS so she can get her associates when she graduates.

Running is a common interest among students at UCAS. It gives them an extra boost, and it’s a fun activity to keep you fit. For most it is also a stress reliever and something that they can turn to when they feel stressed out. Running has also been proven to help with memory, and makes people happier. Students like running because it’s an activity that can do by themselves or with others.

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The Controversial Mind

The world is full of diverse and confusing opinions. Often, people find themselves taking sides on any argument that comes their way. While this is a way that most problems get solved, people often get sucked into arguments that matter very little in the end. Yet why do people get caught up in these matters in the first place?

When people get irritated or annoyed with something going on around them, the instinct is to complain, and try to change the way things work. Arguments are made to convince others to rethink their opinion and join a side. People like to feel powerful and prove that they are in the right, while proving that others are in the wrong.  Many get into arguments to tell others their opinion about something. Whether it be in their life, or not even remotely close to them. Everyone has an opinion, and in this country where free speech is a right, people have the ability to spread their opinion and tell others why they think so.While arguing about something may not fix it, it does give people a sense of accomplishment. Now, they’re able to see who shares their same views.

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