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Andrew Schlachter

Editorials History

Amateurs Unearth Unique Roman Mosaic in UK

Three weeks ago in Boxford, England, a group of 55 volunteer hobbyist archaeologists unearthed what has been described as “without question the most exciting mosaic discovery made in Britain in the last fifty years” (Beeson).

Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, amateurs working alongside several historians spent three summers to locate and excavate the remains of a large Roman villa, including this magnificent mosaic that dates to AD 380.

Roman villas of this timeframe usually consisted of several buildings: one for the owner and his family, another for the slaves, servants, and chef, and a third to store produce until it could be transported for sale. These buildings were arranged in a square or rectangle to create an isolated courtyard in the middle. read more

Entertainment UCAS news

UCAS makes appearance on Studio C

“Wait… Wait… Wait… Wait… 800 South; walk sign is on to cross 800 South.”

Every UCAS student knows the famed (or infamous) crosswalk that gets us safely to and from our UVU classes. However, BYU sketch comedy group Studio C has given this crosswalk an entirely new persona in its newest episode, published at 4pm on Tuesday, October 3.

The episode, titled “A Lonely Crosswalk,” opens with cast member Matthew Meese approaching the 800 S crosswalk from the UVU classroom building. He pushes the crosswalk button, which is voiced by James Perry, waits for the sign to change, and begins to cross. To his surprise, as he takes his first step, the button calls out and urges him to stay and keep it company. As the episode continues, the button is reduced to begging as Matt becomes increasingly frustrated. In the end, Matt ignores the crosswalk and storms into the street, only to be struck by an eastbound car. read more

Featured Technology

The Infinite Soaring Machine

The Infinite Soaring Machine: AI Piloted Glider

Andrew Schlachter

Over the desert sands of Hawthorne, Nevada, the Microsoft glider dubbed “the infinite soaring machine” sails gracefully through the air without aid of engine, propeller, or even a human pilot.

Instead, this advanced AI-piloted craft stays aloft by actively predicting and seeking out pockets of rising air known as thermals, just as a birds of prey do.

“Birds do this seamlessly, and all they’re doing is harnessing nature,” said Ashish Kapoor, one of the principal researchers of the project. “And they do it with a peanut-sized brain.” read more